LARC

Hepatitis


Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is the most common type of hepatitis. It occurs in the UK, but is more common in other countries where sewage disposal is poor.

Hepatitis A is usually caught by putting something in your mouth that has been contaminated with the stools (faeces) of someone with hepatitis A.

It is usually a short-term infection. Although the symptoms can be unpleasant, it is rarely serious.

How do I get tested?

Visit your GP.

Can it be treated?

Yes, it can be treated with drug treatments.

How can I prevent it?

Vaccinations for Hepatitis A are available and are recommended if you are travelling to a country where Hepatitis A is common.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a viral infection, which can cause liver failure. It can easily be transmitted through sexual contact or when the blood of a person with Hepatitis B enters the body of an uninfected person. Hepatitis B is more infectious than HIV and is present in all bodily fluids of someone who is infected.

What are the symptoms?

  • Early flu-like symptoms include headache, tiredness and fever
  • Late symptoms may include jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) or dark brown urine (pee)

How do I get tested?

Visit your GP or find your nearest sexual health clinic using our services page.

Can it be treated?

No, Hepatitis B cannot be treated. Drug treatments are given to manage the symptoms.

How can I prevent it?

A vaccination is available for Hepatitis B. This is strongly recommended for men who have sex with men, as well as people whose activities put them at risk of infection such as drug users who share needles. Any activity that allows blood from an infected person to enter the body is potentially risky and should be avoided. The Hepatitis B virus can remain infectious in dried blood for several days, so don’t share toothbrushes, razors or sex toys.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is present in the blood and, to a much lesser extent, the saliva (spit) and sperm or vaginal fluid of an infected person. It is mostly present in blood so it is usually transmitted through blood-to-blood contact. The most common way you can become infected is by sharing infected needles to inject drugs.

Some people fight off the infection and experience no ill health. Others may develop liver damage, which can lead to serious scarring of the liver and even liver failure.

What are the symptoms?

  • Early flu-like symptoms include headache, tiredness and fever
  • Late symptoms may include jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes) or dark brown urine (pee)

How do I get tested?

Visit your GP or find your nearest sexual health clinic using our services page.

Can it be treated?

No, there is no cure for Hepatitic C. Drug treatments are given to manage the symptoms.

How can I prevent it?

There is no vaccination for Hepatitis C. Any activity that allows blood from an infected person to enter the body is potentially risky and should be avoided.

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Contacts

You Choose
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